Safe drinking Water Safe Drinking Water

Water Quality

Yearly Water Quality Data

Safe Drinking Water The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets standards that, when combined with protecting ground water and surface water, are critical to ensuring safe drinking water. EPA works with its regional offices, states, tribes and its many partners to protect public health through implementing the Safe Drinking Water Act.

EPA has established pollutant-specific minimum testing schedules for public water systems. To find out how frequently your drinking water is tested, contact your water system or the agency in your state in charge of drinking water. If a problem is detected, immediate retesting require- ments go into effect along with strict instructions about how the system informs the public. Until the system can reliably demonstrate that it is free of problems, the retesting is continued.

In many community water systems (CWS) did not conduct testing or report the results for all of the monitoring required to verify the safety of their drinking water. Although failure to monitor does not necessarily suggest safety problems, conducting the required reporting is crucial to ensure that problems will be detected. Consumers can help make sure certain monitoring and reporting requirements are met by first contacting their state drinking water agency to determine if their water supplier is in compliance. If the water system is not meeting the requirements, consumers can work with local and state officials and the water supplier to make sure the required mon- itoring and reporting occurs. A network of government agencies monitor tap water suppliers and enforce drinking water standards to ensure the safety of public water supplies. These agencies include EPA, state departments of health and environment, and local public health departments.

EPA Water Quality Regions



Summary of Yearly Test Results by Region*
*Dates reflect when report was prepared
Contaminant   Click on charts to enlarge

Floride

Water additive which promotes strong teeth

Nitrate (as Nitrogen)

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits.Nitrate can support microbial growth (bacteria and algae). Nitrate levels exceeding the standards can contribute to health issues.

Copper

Copper is found in the earth’s crust which can dissolve into water that is in contact with natural deposits. There is no maximum contaminant level (MCL) for copper at the entry point to the distribution system. It is regulated at customers’ taps.

Lead

Lead is found in the earth’s crust which can dissolve into water that is in contact with natural deposits. There is no maximum contaminant level (MCL) for lead at the entry point to the distribution system. Lead is regulated at customers’ taps .



Disinfectant Treatment   Click on charts to enlarge

Trihalomethane

Trihalomethanes are regulated disinfection byproduct. The disinfection process is carefully controlled to keep byproduct levels low.

Haloacetic Acids

Haloacetic acids are regulated disinfection byproduct. The disinfection process is carefully controlled to keep byproduct levels low.

Chlorine

Chlorine residual is necessary to maintain disinfection throughout the distribution system.

tbd